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Friday June 15, 2012

"Biodiversity Board Game"  and "Home Local Plot Study"
Due Date: Wednesday June 20th

United Nations Decade of Biodiversity 2011-2020 Video

Wednesday June 6, 2012

"Biodiversity Board Game" (Due Date: Wednesday June 20th)

With your partner or on your own create a
"Biodiversity Board Game"
that includes
at least 20 questions and answers.  
Make sure your answers are accurate.  

Your board game must include:
<>a spinner and /or multiple dice (2 or more)
<>100 or more spaces on the game board
<>question cards with answer sheet
<>game rules sheet (e.g., how to pick the first player to start, step by step instructions, etc.)

Before you begin to assemble your board game you must first:
1) prepare a brief explanation of the game
2) sketch a drawing of the game board
3) present this to the teacher for approval

Materials may include:
<>cardboard cards for questions
<>pizza box for board game
<>markers, crayons, etc
<>can be 3D??
<>HAVE FUN and BE CREATIVE


Friday June 1, 2012
Math Unit:
1) Review Rotations

2) Review Rotational Symmetry



Science: Biodiversity
Classification of Organisms
Remember: King Phillip Came Over For Gina's Spaghetti

Kingdoms (5)
(Monera or Bacteria - Protists/Protista - Fungi - Plants - Animals)
  I   
Phyllum
Examples of phyla in the "animals kingdom"
Arthropoda (spiders, insects, crustaceans), Mollusca (clams, snails, squid),
Chordata (backbone: mammals, reptiles, fish, amphibians, birds)
   I     
Class
Examples of classes in phyllum called "chordata"
Reptilia (reptiles), Mammalia (mammals), Aves (birds), Amphibia (amphibians)
I
Order
Examples of order in the Mammalia class
Primates (monkeys), Perissodactyla (horses, zebras), Rodentia (rats, mice), Chiroptera (bats), Insectivora (moles), Carnivora (dogs, cats, weasels), Artiodactyla (cows), Proboscidea (elephants), etc.
I
Family
Examples of family in the order Carnivora
Ursidae (bear), Mustelidae (weasels, wolverines), Canidae (dogs), Felidae (cats), Hyaenidae (hyaenas, wolves), etc.
I
Genus
Examples of genus in the family Felidae (cats)
Acinonyx (cheetah), Panthera (lion, tiger), Felis (domestic cats), etc.
I
Species
Examples of species within the genus Panthera (lion, tiger)
Panthera leo (lion), Panthera tigris (tiger)
                


Biodiversity Fact: The Great Lakes region in Ontario has one of the highest diversities of ecological systems in North America, including many systems that are globally rare and irreplaceable (Comer et al. 2003).  This diversity is largely driven by the coastal features and processes of the Great Lakes

Wednesday May 30, 2012
Science Unit: Biodiversity

Fact: Carolus Linnaeus (1707-1778): The inventor of modern "scientific classification" was a Swedish botanist who classified and described more than 4,400 species of animals and 7,700 species of plants.
Biodiversity Vocabulary
biodiversity: variety of living organisms in a given area; biological diversity refers to the variety ot species and ecosystems on Earth; three components of biodiversity are ecosystem, species and genetic diversity;  
In a habitat, the variety of organisms living in the area determines the amount of biodiversity. Scientists also consider the genetic diversity of the pool, the number of different species of organisms, and different ecosystems represented to determine if an area is truly exhibiting biodiversity.
classify: to arrange by category
Organisms are classified into five different kingdoms based on the number of similar characteristics among organisms. For example, all plants, from onions to grass to trees, are in theplant kingdom.
community: the populations of an ecosystem
Context: All the populations of a habitat make up a community.
habitat: the place in which an organism lives
Info: Organisms live in a variety of different habitats, such as forests, meadows, and streams.
population: a group of organisms of the same species living in an ecosystem
Info: In biodiversity studies, scientists determine the population by counting all members of a single species.
symbiosis: a close relationship between two species
Info: Lichens are really two organisms—a fungus and an alga—that have a symbiotic relationship. Alga provides the fungus with nutrients, and the fungus provides the alga with moisture.

More Vocabulary: Classification of Living Organisms into Five Kingdoms
Monera or Bacteria:
<>are single-celled organisms that don’t have a nucleus.
<>more forms of bacteria than any other organism on Earth.
<>some bacteria are beneficial to us
<>some assist in breaking down dead matter
<>some assist in digestion (such as the ones found in yogurt.)
<>others can cause us to get sick.
Protists/Protista:
<>are mostly single-celled organisms that have a nucleus.
<>usually live in water.
<>some protists move around, while others stay in one place.
<>some examples of protists include some algae, paramecium, and amoeba.
Fungi:
<>motionless organisms that absorb nutrients for survival.
<>ingest other organisms to get their nutrients.
<>are the largest organisms on Earth and they include mushrooms, molds, and yeasts.
Plants:
<>contain chlorophyll, a green pigment necessary for photosynthesis, a process in which plants convert energy from sunlight into food.
<>their cell walls are made sturdy by a material called cellulose, and they are fixed in one place.
<>divided into two groups: flower- and fruit-producing plants and those that don’t produce flowers or fruits. They include garden flowers, agricultural crops, grasses, shrubs, ferns, mosses, and conifers.
Animals:
<>are the most complex organisms on Earth.
<>are multi-celled organisms, eat food for survival, and have nervous systems.
<>divided into vertebrates and invertebrates and include mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds, insects, fish, and insects.
<>can move

Web Links:

Aquatic Life on the Great Barrier Reef.
This site has excellent photographs accompanied by interesting facts about the Great Barrier Reef.It will serve as a great resource to familiarize students with the science of the reef.
Jellyfish: My Life as a Blob
Follow the joys and heartbreaks of the wet, the wild, the crazy gelatinous zooplankton.
Biodiversity News


Monday May 28, 2012
Math Homework MMS Practice Book: Unit 7 Lesson 1: Transformations


Math Unit 7 - Transformational Geometry

Transformation Game: translations, rotations, reflections

Rotational Symmetry:

How Tessalations Display Different Kinds of Symmetry:

Tessalation Instructions:


Future Math Topic: Probability
Friday May 25, 2012
Congratulations students of 6-2!  You completed EQAO and deserve to celebrate your efforts!  I hope the "Spring Fling" was a great way to begin your weekend.  Thank you for maintaining your focus and respecting others.  Without a doubt, you are an awesome group of students!!

EQAO
What is it?
Parent's Guide to EQAO.pdf
When is it?
May 23, 24, & 25


FYI: Converting units of measure ("unit" can be metre, gram, or Litre):

King Henry's daughter usually drinks chocolate milk
kilo-  hecto-      deka-      unit-     deci-     centi-      milli-

km      hm         Dkm          m         dm        cm          mm
To convert to lower units of measure for linear measure: move decimal one place to the right.    
.->     ex. 30 km   becomes   300 hm
km2     hm2         Dkm2         m2          dm2        cm2           mm2
To convert to lower units of measure for area (square2) measure: move decimal two places to the right.
.-->     ex. 30 km2   becomes   3000 hm2

km3     hm3          Dkm3        m3         dm3         cm3            mm3
To convert to lower units of measure for volume (cube3) measure: move decimal three places to the right.
.--->  ex. 30 km3   becomes   30000 hm3

We had a wonderful turnout to the "Silver Creek Star Party"!  Thank you to Brian for another very informative session - and for providing us with an opportunity to view  Saturn and Venus through the telescopes.  Are we alone?

Check out these interesting astronomy websites to learn even more about S-P-A-C-E!!!!!

Monday May 14, 2012
7:30PM - Special Event: "Space Guy" evening event: "Star Party" at Silver Creek
*Students need to be accompanied by an adult as it will be dark out!

Quiz on Wednesday - Fractions
(mixed numbers and improper fractions)
Fraction Practice: watch the videos and play the games
Equivalent Fractions
Ordering Mixed Numbers
Adding and Subtracting Fractions:
Writing Fractions as Decimals
Fractions, Decimals


Review how to convert a fraction to a decimal then a decimal to a percent.
Example: 1/5 is a fraction.  
To make it into a decimal...divide the numerator by the denominator.
So...1 divided by 5 equals 0.2
      0.2
   5)1.0
      1 0
         0
Next, to make the decimal into a percent,
Multiply 0.2 x 100 (or shift decimal two spaces to the right)
Answer: 20%

Example: 7/9 is a fraction
(Note: when numbers 1 to 8 are divided by 9 you get a repeating decimal)
To make it into a decimal...divide the numerator by the denominator.
So...7 divided by 9 equals 0.77 (you can stop at two 7s for this answer).
      0.777  since this is a repeating fraction - 0.7777777
    9)7.000
      6 3
         70
         63
           70
           63
             7
Next, to make the decimal into a percent,
Multiply 0.77 x 100 (or shift decimal two spaces to the right)
Answer: 77%

Learn Ahead....Our Next Topic will be...
"Transformational Geometry"
<>rotations <>translations <>reflections



Friday May 11, 2012
Special Event: "Space Guy" presentation Mon May 14 - $6 fee
Additional evening event: "Star Party" at Silver Creek PS - Time TBA
*Students need to be accompanied by an adult as it will be dark out!

Math Homework: Unit 8 Lesson #6
Fractions Quiz: Wednesday May 16 (MMS Lessons 1-5)
Equivalent Fractions
Mixed Numbers & Improper Fractions
Adding & Subtracting Fractions

Fraction Practice: watch the videos and play the games
Equivalent Fractions
Ordering Mixed Numbers
Adding and Subtracting Fractions:
Writing Fractions as Decimals
Fractions, Decimals

Coming Soon....
EQAO
What is it?
Parent's Guide to EQAO.pdf
When is it?
May 23, 24, & 25


Wednesday May 9, 2012
Math Homework: Unit 8 Lesson #5 Subtracting Fractions
Fractions Quiz: Wednesday May 16 (MMS Lessons 1-5)


Monday May 7, 2012
Math Homework: Unit 8 Lesson #4 Adding Fractions
Fractions Quiz: Wednesday May 16 (MMS Lessons 1-5)

Review Strategies
Committing Learning to Long-Term Memory
Review what you've learnt to increase retention.

Have you ever learned a new skill, but then forgotten almost everything about it within a few weeks?
When you don't have the chance to apply new knowledge, it's easy to forget what you have learned. This is why it's so important not only to take notes, but also to review what you have learned regularly, so that you can remember it in the long-term.  In this article, we'll look at the benefits of reviewing information, and we explore several strategies that you can use to do this effectively.

Why Review Information?
When we learn new information, we remember it best immediately after we have learned it. We then forget details as time passes. Even after a few days, we may be able to recall only a little of what we initially learned.
So, to remember what've we've learned over the long-term, we need to move information from our short-term memory (what we're currently thinking about or aware of) into our long-term memory.
To do this, we need to review what we've learned, and we need to do this often. It takes time to commit information to our long-term memory, and reviewing information helps us do this.

How to Review Information Effectively
We'll now look at some simple strategies that you can use to move knowledge from your short-term memory to your long-term memory.
1. Review Immediately
Begin by spending a few minutes reviewing material immediately after you've learned about it. This helps you confirm that you understand the information, and reduces the time needed to "relearn" it when you review it again in the future.  As you re-read material, use effective reading strategies to make sure that you're reading efficiently and intelligently. For instance, if you've just read a chapter in a business book, you may only need to review section headings and the conclusion.
2. Rewrite Materials
Rewriting and reorganizing your notes is another great way to review information.
This might seem like a waste of time at first. However, rewriting can be a very effective method for reinforcing what you've learned. Research shows that the act of rewriting notes helps us clarify our understanding.
One way to do this is to put the information you have learned into Mind Maps. These are especially good for rewriting notes, because they force you to make connections between concepts and themes.
You can also simply jot down key points in bullet form, or tidy up any original notes.
3. Schedule Reviews
Remember it takes time to move information to your long-term memory. So, it's important to review information frequently.  It's best to carry out a review after a day, after a week, and after a month; and then to review your notes every few months thereafter.  Make sure that you schedule time for your reviews, otherwise they will just get pushed aside when urgent issues come up. Also, put these on your To-Do List, or into your Action Program.
Again, you'll also find it useful to write notes during these regular reviews. Try jotting down what you can remember about the subject, and then compare these notes with your original ones. This will show you what you've forgotten, and will help you refresh your memory.

Tip 1: Reviewing learned information is the final step in the SQ3R process. SQ3R (which stands for Survey, Question, Read, Recall and Review) is a particularly potent method for assimilating information, and for getting the greatest benefit from your learning experience.
Tip 2: Sleep also helps your memory and research shows that we remember more when we get a good night's sleep.


Key Points
To remember what we've learned, we need to commit information to our long-term memory. A great way of doing this is by reviewing information regularly.  To review information, revisit learning material straight after you've learned it, using an effective reading strategy.  Also, write notes about what you've learned using tools such as Mind Maps, and then review this information one day, one week, and one month later. Then revisit the information every few months.



Wednesday May 2, 2012
Math Homework: Unit 8 Lesson #3
"Comparing and Ordering Mixed Fractions"

More...
Fraction Practice: watch the videos and play the games
Equivalent Fractions
Ordering Mixed Numbers
Adding and Subtracting Fractions:
Writing Fractions as Decimals
Fractions, Decimals


Additional Review of Measurement Concepts:
Front Side Top View
Perimeter and Area
Relationship of Perimeter and Area
Volume and Surface Area of Cubes
Volume and Surface Area of Triangular Prisms




Monday April 30, 2012
Volume Test today
Homework due today: Unit 8 Lesson 1 - "Equivalent Fractions"
Math Homework: Unit 8 Lesson 2 - "Relating Mixed and Improper Fractions"
Jersey Day tomorrow!

Communicate What You Know About Math
Have a conversation with your parents about: perimeter, area and volume.
Topics:
<>Explain the meaning of "perimeter" in your own words.
<>How are the side lengths of a figure and its perimeter related?
<>Explain the meaning of "area" in your own words.
<>What happens to the "perimeter" and "area" of a rectangle when the side lengths are multiplied by the same number (e.g. x3 or tripled)?
<>Explain the meaning of "volume" in your own words.
<>How does the "volume" of a triangular prism relate to the "volume" of a rectangular prism?




Thursday April 26, 2012
Math Homework: Unit 8 Lesson 1 (Equivalent Fractions - due on Monday April 30)
Equivalent Fractions on-line activity

Identifying Equivalent Fractions
Equivalent fractions are fractions that have the same value or represent the same part of an object.

If a pie is cut into two pieces, each piece is also one-half of the pie. If a pie is cut into 4 pieces, then two pieces represent the same amount of pie that 1/2 did. We say that 1/2 is equivalent to 2/4.

Fractions are determined to be equivalent by multiplying the numerator and denominator of one fraction by the same number. This number should be such that the numerators will be equal after the multiplication.

For example if we compare 1/2 and 2/4, we would multiply 1/2 by 2/2 or...

1  1x2=2
2  2x2=4     which would result in  2/4 so they are equivalent.

To compare 1/2 and 3/7 we would multiply 1/2 by 3/3 to produce 3/6.

1   1x3=3
2   2x3=6      However....since 3/6 is not the same as 3/7, the fractions are
                not equivalent.

  • Fractions equivalent to 1/2 are 2/4, 3/6, 4/8, 5/10, 6/12 ...
  • Fractions equivalent to 1/3 are 2/6, 3/9, 4/12, 5/15, ...
  • Fractions equivalent to 1/4 are 2/8, 3/12, 4/16, 5/20, ...
  • Fractions equivalent to 1/5 are 2/10, 3/15, 4/20, 5/25, ...
  • Fractions equivalent to 2/5 are 4/10, 6/15, 8/20, 10/25, ...


Wednesday April 25, 2012
Tomorrow is a "switch day" - we will be following the Friday schedule
Math Homework: Unit 8 Lesson 1 (Equivalent Fractions - due on Monday April 30)
Math Quiz on Volume: Monday April 30
***Review Volume: see volume information and on-line games below (Friday April 20)

Monday April 23, 2012
Science Quiz - Ch. 5 & 6 on Wednesday April 25
No math homework - review for quiz
Volume Quiz (rectangular and triangular prisms) on Monday April 30



Friday April 20, 2012
Math Homework: Unit 9 Lesson 7 (Volume of a Triangular Prism)

On-line Measurement Games:


Volume Triangular Prism = (bxh) x H
                               2

3s20.gif



Steps to Calculate Volume of a Triangular Prism
1) First calculate the area of the triangle at the end of the prism A=bxh
                                                                 2
2) Next, imagine tipping the triangular prism onto its triangle end (also called the Base Area) - so the triangle is now on the bottom of the prism (picture tipping a Toblerone chocolate bar onto its end).

3) Now, the "Height" with a CAPITAL H is the new dimension or third dimension that is being included in this formula. This is the "Height" of the Toblerone going from the bottom Base Area up to the top of the Toblerone.


Wednesday April 18, 2012
Math Homework: Unit 6 Lessons 6&7 (Volume) due Fri April 20
Science Homework: Review Notes for Upcoming Science Assessments
Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 3&4 on Monday April 23
Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 5&6 on Wednesday April 25

Calculating Volume

Volume is measured in cubes (or cubic units).

illustration of a cuboidHow many cubes are in this rectangular prism (cuboid)?
We can count the cubes although it is quicker to take the length, width, and height and use multiplication. The rectangular prism above has an volume of 48 cubic units.




The volume of a rectangular prism is
= length x width x height



Examples of calculating the area of a rectangle

We need to do two multiplications to work out the volume. We calculate the area of one face (or side) and multiply that by its height. The examples below show how there are three ways of doing this.


example showing how to work out volume


Area = 6 x 4 = 24

Volume = Area x 2

Volume = 24 x 2 = 48 cubic units


example showing how to work out volume


Area = 6 x 2 = 12

Volume = Area x 4

Volume = 12 x 4 = 48 cubic units


file:///C:/DOCUME~1/STEWAR~1.IHD/LOCALS~1/Temp/msoclip1/01/.gif


Area = 4 x 2 = 8

Volume = Area x 6

Volume = 8 x 6 = 48 cubic units




Total Surface Area of a Prism
SA= (Area Top+Area Bottom+Area Front+Area Back+Area Left Side+Area Right Side)
Surface Area of Prisms SA=area front+area back+area side1+area  side2+area top+area bottom
pic-demoprism.gif


Prism Surface Area Formula
Area Top
= l x w
Area Bottom
= l x w
Area Front
= h x l
Area Back
= h x l
Area Left Side
= h x w
Area Right Side
= h x w
Total Surface Area
= lw + lw + hl + hl + hw + hw

Surface Area

Definition of Surface Area
The area of a figure is nothing more than the sum of all unit squares of a figure.

A unit Square can be:
1 cm x 1 cm
or
1 m x 1 m
or
1 km x 1 km
or
a square by some other unit.

pic-square.gif


Friday April 13, 2012
Measurement Unit Test has be moved to Monday April 16
Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 1&2 on Wednesday April 18
Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 3&4 on Monday April 23
Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 5&6 on Wednesday April 25


Wednesday April 11, 2012
Measurement Unit Test has be moved to Monday April 16
Math Homework: Unit 6 Lesson 5 - Surface Area of a Prism
(MMS Practice Book p. 86 & 87)
Math: Perimeter, Area of Parallelograms and Area of Triangles Practice:

Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 1&2 on Wednesday April 18
Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 3&4 on Monday April 23
Science "Space" Quiz: Chapters 5&6 on Wednesday April 25
Science Homework: Review Chapters 1-6
1: The Solar System
2: Bodies in Motion
3: Lights in the Sky
4: Humans in Space
5: Technology and Space
6: Space Exploration and Society


Wednesday April 4, 2012
Measurement Unit Test has be moved to Monday April 16
Math Homework Sheets:
#1 Area of Right Triangles and Irregular Polygons (completed)
#2 Area of Parallelograms (completed)
#3 Area of Triangles (due: Wednesday April 11)

Monday April 2, 2012
No math homework.
Review D.A.R.E. material for test on Wednesday April 4.
Tomorrow is a "switch" day - (Friday) - math period 1, literacy periods 4-6.


Friday March 30, 2012
Quiz: Area of Parallelograms and Triangles on Monday April 2
Homework: Review for Test - Perimeter and Area Page

Announcing...
Silver Creek's 2012
Grade Six D.A.R.E.Graduation Ceremony
(Drug Awareness and Resistance Education)
Certificates will be presented to students by
Constable Barnett (Halton Police Department)
Friday April 13 at 1:30PM
In the gym

Math: Perimeter, Area of Parallelograms and Area of Triangles Practice:

Special Announcement!!  D.A.R.E. Assembly - Friday April 13 (Time: TBD)
Grade Six D.A.R.E.(Drug Awareness and Resistance Education) Graduation Ceremony
Certificates presented to students by Constable Barnett (Halton Police Department)
Each grade six student will be receiving a certificate for completing the D.A.R.E. program.
Several students from our class have been selected by Constable Barnett to share their DARE essays with Silver Creek during the culminating DARE assembly on Friday April 13 in the gym.  Time: TBA.

Wednesday March 28, 2012
Homework: Explain in your own words the following terms:
Perimeter, Area of a Rectangle, Area of a Parallelogram, Area of a Triangle.
Include diagram and formula with your explanation.
(e.g. Perimeter: a way to measure the outside lengths of a closed figure.)

Quiz: Area of Parallelograms and Triangles on Friday March 30
Unit Test: Metric Conversion, Perimeter, Area, Area of Parallelograms and Triangles, Surface Area, Volume of Rectangular Prism on Wednesday April 11
Review Questions (1-12): pages 374 & 375 in MMS Text Book

Monday March 26, 2012
Math Homework: MMS Practise Book Unit 9 Perimeter, Area, and Volume
Lesson 6 Exploring Triangles and Parallelograms
Quiz: Area of Parallelograms and Triangles on Friday March 30

Friday March 23, 2012
No homework

Wednesday March 21, 2012
Quiz: Perimeter and Area on Friday March 23
Math Homework: MMS Practise Book Unit 9 Perimeter, Area, and Volume
Lesson 4 Area of Parallelogram and Lesson 5 Area of Triangles

Monday March 19, 2012
Math Homework: MMS Practise Book Unit 9 Perimeter, Area, and Volume
Lesson 1 Perimeter and Lesson 2 Area
Math Quiz: Perimeter and Area on Friday March 23

Science Homework:
Complete Lunar Log for: Monday March 19 - Sunday March 25
Track Lunar images on the following website:

>>>>Science News>>>>Solar Flares - Biggest Space Storm in Seven Years!
While the moon appears as a light in the night sky - it is really a rocky body that emits no light.  We can see the moon only because it reflects sunlight.  Meanwhile, all stars emit light.  A star is a ball of burning gas releasing heat through great explosions.  These explosions make the star so hot it glows.  The closest star to Earth is our sun.  Another way our night skies light up are from a phenomenon called the Aurora Borealis or the Northern Lights.  Recently, our sun has been releasing particles through many solar explosions.  These particles are drawn into the magnetic field that surrounds our planet and have been reaching our Earth's atmosphere.  By mixing with different gases in in the Earth's upper atmosphere lights of vivid colours may be produced.  Typically known as the Northern Lights and because the magnetic field is strongest in the North.  Check out the Canadian Space Agency website on the current status of the Aurora Borealis.



Thursday March 8, 2012
Math Homework:
"Perimeter and Area of a Rectangle" sheet (also area of parallogram) (due Monday March 20)

Perimeter: add together lengths of each side
(e.g. P= length 1 + length 2 + length 3 + length 4)

Area of Rectangle: multiply length times width
(e.g. A= length times width or lxw=___cm squared)

Area of Parallelogram: multiply base length times height
(e.g. A= base times height or bxh= ___cm squared)

Volume of a Prism: multiply length times width times height (e.g. V=lxwxh= ? cm cubed)

Wednesday March 7, 2012
Science Homework:
Lunar Logs: to be completed over the next 12 days (Wednesday March 7-Sunday March 19)
Lunar Logs due: Monday March 20
If it is cloudy the following website will provide an update on the lunar phase.

Monday March 5, 2012
Math Quiz on Wednesday March 6 - Metric Conversion.

Math Homework: Complete Metric Conversion chart for Wednesday
Metric ConversionTips:  
To convert to a smaller unit, move decimal point to the right or multiply.
To convert to a larger unit, move decimal point to the left or divide.

Science: An additional Lunar Log will be sent home on Wednesday March 6 - our skies have not been clear enough to track the moon each night so far.  

Wednesday February 29, 2012
Science Homework: Lunar Logs - illustrate and record direction of the moon for the next seven nights (due date: Wednesday March 6)
For interesting facts about the night sky...check out:

Friday February 24, 2012
Math Homework: Data Management Package

Wednesday February 22, 2012
Challenge yourself...try out the following website to calculate:
Mean, Median, Mode, and Range
(NOT SURE HOW??? see Review Section below)


A Conversation About "Mean" and "Mode"...Between a Student and his Tutor...
Student: Which one is better: mean, median or mode?
Mentor: It depends on your goals. I can give you some examples to show you why. Consider a company that has nine employees with salaries of $35,000 a year, and their supervisor makes $150,000 a year. If you want to describe the typical salary in the company, which set of statistics will you use?
Student: I will use mode($35,000), because it tells what salary most people get.
Mentor: What if you are a recruiting officer for the company that wants to make a good impression on a prospective employee?
Student: The mean is ($35,000x9 + $150,000)/10 =$46,500. You could say "The average salary in our company is $46,500" using mean.
Mentor: In each case, you have to decide for yourself which statistics to use.
Student: You also have to think about which statistics other people are using before you make any quick decisions and be disappointed!



Wednesday February 15, 2012
Math Unit 5 - Data Management
Math Homework: MMS (Math Makes Sense) Practise Book
Unit 5 Lesson 4 - Constructing and Interpreting Graphs
(Graph paper available in the classroom).

Monday February 13, 2012
Math Unit 5 - Data Management
Math Homework: MMS (Math Makes Sense) Practise Book
Unit 5 Lesson 1 - Interpreting Data
Unit 5 Lesson 2 - Finding the Median

Graphing Review:
HOW TO CHOOSE WHICH TYPE OF GRAPH TO USE?
When to Use . . .Line Graph? Pie Chart? Bar Graph?

. . . a Line graph.
<>Line graphs are used to track changes over short and long periods of time.
<>When smaller changes exist, line graphs are better to use than bar graphs.
<>Line graphs can also be used to compare changes over the same period of time for more than one group.

. . . a Pie Chart.
<>Pie charts are best to use when you are trying to compare parts of a whole. They do not show changes over time.

. . . a Bar Graph.
<>Bar graphs are used to compare things between different groups or to track changes over time.
<>However, when trying to measure change over time, bar graphs are best when the changes are larger.


Mean, Median, and Mode Review:

Find the
<>mean,
<>median and
<>mode for the following data:

5, 15, 10, 15, 5, 10, 10, 20, 25, 15
(You will need to organize the data.) 

5, 5, 10, 10, 10, 15, 15, 15, 20, 25


Mean:
120212_94222_0.png

Median:
5, 5, 10, 10, 10, 15, 15, 15, 20, 25
Listing the data in order is the easiest way to find the median. The numbers 10 and 15 both fall in the middle. Average these two numbers to get the median. 10 + 15 = 12.5
                                                      2
Mode:
Two numbers appear most often:
10 and 15. There are three 10's and three 15's. In this example there are two answers†for the mode.
        

Frid
ononCy February 10, 20

12
Math Home work
age: Data Management
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Wednesday February 8, 2012
Momework
<>Review for Science Test on Friday February 10
<>Review notes in Science Notebook (Blue Duotang)

Monday February 6, 2012 Monday February 6, 2012
Math Unit 3 Test Date: extended to Wednesday February 8
Key Concepts:
Lesson 1 Investigating Angles: straight angle is 180 degrees, acute, obtuse, one complete turn is 360 degrees
Lesson 2 Classifying Figures by Attributes:
1) kinds of polygons (regular, irregular, convex, concave),
2) number of sides (circle, semi-circle, triangle, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, etc.)
3) kinds of sides: (parallel, equal)
4) kinds of angles: (reflex, acute, obtuse, right)
Lesson 4 Constructing Figures: using ruler, protractor, compass
Lesson 6 Illustrating Objects: A drawing of a 3D object on triangular dot paper is an Isometric Drawin
Math Unit 3 Test Date: extended to Wednesday February 8
Key Concepts:
Lesson 1 Investigating Angles: straight angle is 180 degrees, acute, obtuse, one complete turn is 360 degrees
Lesson 2 Classifying Figures by Attributes:
1) kinds of polygons (regular, irregular, convex, concave),
2) number of sides (circle, semi-circle, triangle, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, etc.)
3) kinds of sides: (parallel, equal)
4) kinds of angles: (reflex, acute, obtuse, right)
Lesson 4 Constructing Figures: using ruler, protractor, compass
Lesson 6 Illustrating Objects: A drawing of a 3D object on triangular dot paper is an Isometric Drawing.
Some Ideas/Strategies for Review:
1) Complete Homework (Extra Practice pages for Unit 3 - Lessons 1,2,4,6)
2) Review material at Math Clinic (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday)
3) Ask questions and participate during class.
4) Check out the website.
5) Refer to anchor charts and success criteria.
6) Finish homework from MMS Practice Book Unit 3 Lessons 1,2,4,6
7) Review success criteria for Using a Protractor

Science Test Date: extended to Friday February 10
Key Concepts:
WHAT IS ELECTRICITY?
Electricity is a form of energy. Electricity is the flow of electrons. All matter is made up of atoms, and an atom has a center, called a nucleus. The nucleus contains positively charged particles called protons and uncharged particles called neutrons. The nucleus of an atom is surrounded by negatively charged particles called electrons.

The negative charge of an electron is equal to the positive charge of a proton, and the number of electrons in an atom is usually equal to the number of protons. When the balancing force between protons and electrons is upset by an outside force, an atom may gain or lose an electron. When electrons are "lost" from an atom, the movement of these electrons creates an electric current.

Electricity is a basic part of nature and it is one of our most widely used forms of energy. We get electricity from the conversion of primary sources of energy:
fossil fuels, nuclear power and other natural sources: wind, solar, water.

Many cities and towns were built alongside waterfalls (a primary source of mechanical energy) that turned water wheels to perform work. Before electricity generation began slightly over 100 years ago, houses were lit with kerosene lamps, food was cooled in iceboxes, and rooms were warmed by wood-burning or coal-burning stoves.
conductor: a material, usually metal, that transmits electricity
insulator: a material, such as rubber or plastic, that does not transmit electricity.
static electricity: a single sudden transfer of electrons from place to another caused by a buildup of negative charges in one place and positive charges in another.
current electricity: a steady flow of electrons along a circuit.

CIRCUITS:
circuit: a closed path along which an electric current travels. All circuits have 3 main parts: apower source, a conducting path and a load (e.g. lightbulb). A switchallows you to control the flow of current in an electrical circuit.
series circuit: is a circuit that only has one path.  All of the loads (e.g. lightbulbs) are connected side by side on one path. If there is a break in the path of electricity the entire circuit willnot work.
parallel circuit: is a circuit that has several paths for electricity to flow through. Each load (e.g. light bulb) usually has its own branch.  A break in one branch will not affect the other branches.

SOME PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCES:
How they make electricity and some PROS and CONS:

Fossil Fuels (coal, oil, gas) are burned to create heat which boils water causing steam.  Steam turns turbines and a generator converts this motion into electricity.
PRO and CONS: Fossil fuels are inexpensive to produce but there is a limited supply.  Also, smoke caused by burning the fossil fuels results in air pollution and the production of carbon dioxide which contributes to climate change.

Wind is captured by gigantic turbine generators which produce electrical energy.
PROS and CONS: There is an endless supply of wind energy that can be harnessed by large turbines without polluting the environment.  However, these turbines have been criticized for being too expensive, endangering bird life and causing an eyesore.

Fast Moving Water (waterfalls, rivers, tides) can be captured and used to turn large turbines causing a generator to convert this motion into electricity.
PROS and CONS: Currently, there is an endless amount of water releasing energy that can be captured and turned into electricity without causing pollution or costing very much money.  However, hydoelectric plants are expensive to build, they are very large and can put a strain on fish and wildlife habitats.

Nuclear Energy (nuclear fission of uranium atoms) is the process of splitting atoms, or fissioning them. Imagine about 200 marbles (these are the protons and neutrons) lying on a flat surface, all jumbled together, and roughly forming a circle. If someone took another marble and threw it at them, they would fly all around in different directions creating a lot of energy.  This energy releases a lot of heat which is used to create steam.  The steam is used to turn turbines that generate electricity.
PROS and CONS: The biggest advantage with nuclear energy is that it is an established way to generate electricity without emitting carbon dioxide. This is more and more important as global warming becomes a real threat to the environment.The disadvantages of nuclear energy can be very harmful to people and animals. Nuclear power plants produce nuclear waste after making the electricity and the bad thing about this is that the waste can not be thrown away like garbage


HOW IS ELECTRICITY GENERATED?
generator: a machine that turns motion into electricity.
An electric generator is a device for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy. The process is based on the relationship between magnetism and electricity. When a wire or any other electrically conductive material moves across a magnetic field, an electric current occurs in the wire.
120205_111432_0.png

Monday January 30, 2012
Math Unit 3 Test - Monday February 6
Some Ideas/Strategies for Review:
1) Complete Homework (Extra Practice pages for Unit 3 - Lessons 1,2,4,6)
2) Review material at Math Clinic (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday)
3) Ask questions and participate during class.
4) Check out the website.
5) Refer to anchor charts and success criteria.
6) Finish homework from MMS Practice Book Unit 3 Lessons 1,2,4,6
7) Review success criteria for Using a Protractor

Lesson 1 Investigating Angles: straight angle is 180 degrees, acute, obtuse, one complete turn is 360 degrees
Lesson 2 Classifying Figures by Attributes:
1) kinds of polygons (regular, irregular, convex, concave),
2) number of sides (circle, semi-circle, triangle, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, etc.)
3) kinds of sides: (parallel, equal)
4) kinds of angles: (reflex, acute, obtuse, right)
Lesson 4 Constructing Figures: using ruler, protractor, compass
Lesson 6 Illustrating Objects: A drawing of a 3D object on triangular dot paper is an Isometric Drawing.

Success Criteria
Learning Gool: Using a protractor.
_ I can identify the angle I want to measure by drawing an arc.
_ I can place the middle of the "upside down T" or the "small circle" on the vertex of angle.
_ I can place the bottom line of the protractor on the "bottom" line of the angle.
_ I can measure the angle by locating the 0 degrees on the protractor and counting up to the "top" line of the angle.

Science Electricity Test - Wednesday February 8
Topics: (review notes in blue duotang)
1) series and parallel circuits (see notes)
2) conductors and insulators (see notes)
3) energy resources (more review on Wednesday February 1)
4) static and current electricity (see notes)


Friday January 27, 2012
Math Homework: MMS Practice Book Unit 3 Lesson #6 Illustrating Objects
Science Electricity Test - Wednesday February 8
Topics:
1) series and parallel circuits
2) conductors and insulators
3) energy resources
4) static and current electricity

Wednesday January 25, 2012
Math Homework: MMS Practice Book Unit 3 Lesson #4 Constructing Figures - Question 1
1) Use a ruler and a protractor.  Construct rectangle ABCD with length 5 cm and width 4 cm.

Monday January 23, 2012
Our Science Definition Matching Quiz has been postponed to Friday January 27.
Electricity Unit Test: Wednesday February 8th

Math Homework: MMS Practice Book Unit 3 Lesson #1 Investigating Angles & #2 Classifying Figures


Friday January 20, 2012
Are you able to match the word with the defintion?? Remember to practise for our...
Science Definitions Quiz: Wednesday January 25

Review the following definitions:
alternating current (AC): an electric current in which electrons move rapidly back and forth
atoms: the smallest parts of an element
attract: to pull something closer
circuit: a closed path along which an electric current travels
conductor: a material, usually metal, that transmits electricity
direct current (DC): an electric current in which electrons move in one direction
electric current: the movement of electrons through matter
electricity: a form of energy made when tiny parts move around in an atom; energy that can power many devices.
electromagnet: a magnet that can be turned on or off and is made by sending electricity through metal.
electrons: particles in an atom that orbit the nucleus and have a negative electrical charge.
generator: a machine that turns motion into electricity.
insulator: a material, such as rubber or plastic, that does not transmit electricity.
lines of force: invisible lines of magnetic force that flow through and around a magnetism, forming a magnetic field.
magnetic field: an area around a magnet where magnetic force can be felt.
neutrons: particles in the nucleus of an atom that have no electrical charge.
north pole: the end of a magnet where lines of force flow out.
permanent magnet: a material that is always magnetic.
power plant: a factory that makes electricity.
protons: particles in the nucleus of an atom that have a positive electrical charge.
repel: to push something away.
south pole: the end of a magnet where lines of force flow in.
static electricity: electricity caused by a buildup of negative charges in one place and positive charges in another.
temporary magnet: a material that is magnetic only while in the magnetic field produced by an electric current or permanent magnet.

Wednesday January 18, 2012
<>DARE with Constable Barnett started today.  The students listened very attentively and are looking forward to her next visit - Wednesday February 1.
<>Math: No homework - still some tests to be signed and returned to school.  
<>Science: Review definitions (listed below) for Science Definitions Quiz on Wednesday January 25.

Monday January 16, 2012
Math Test on Multiplication and Long Division on Wednesday January 16, 2012.

Review Multiplication (3 digit by 2 digit - e.g., 242X43=8228)
Note: Check your multiplication by dividing the product by a factor
(e.g., 242X34=8228 Check: 8228 divided by 34=242)

Review Long Division of Whole Numbers
Note: Check your division by multiplying the quotient and divisor
(e.g., 420 divided by 5=84  Check: 84X5=420)

Science Definitions Quiz: Wednesday January 25
Review the following definitions:
alternating current (AC): an electric current in which electrons move rapidly back and forth
atoms: the smallest parts of an element
attract: to pull something closer
circuit: a closed path along which an electric current travels
conductor: a material, usually metal, that transmits electricity
direct current (DC): an electric current in which electrons move in one direction
electric current: the movement of electrons through matter
electricity: a form of energy made when tiny parts move around in an atom; energy that can power many devices.
electromagnet: a magnet that can be turned on or off and is made by sending electricity through metal.
electrons: particles in an atom that orbit the nucleus and have a negative electrical charge.
generator: a machine that turns motion into electricity.
insulator: a material, such as rubber or plastic, that does not transmit electricity.
lines of force: invisible lines of magnetic force that flow through and around a magnetism, forming a magnetic field.
magnetic field: an area around a magnet where magnetic force can be felt.
neutrons: particles in the nucleus of an atom that have no electrical charge.
north pole: the end of a magnet where lines of force flow out.
permanent magnet: a material that is always magnetic.
power plant: a factory that makes electricity.
protons: particles in the nucleus of an atom that have a positive electrical charge.
repel: to push something away.
south pole: the end of a magnet where lines of force flow in.
static electricity: electricity caused by a buildup of negative charges in one place and positive charges in another.
temporary magnet: a material that is magnetic only while in the magnetic field produced by an electric current or permanent magnet.
Friday January 13, 2012

Science Definitions Quiz: Wednesday January 25
(Review "electricity" definitions discussed in class - use handout provided to you today).

Math Homework: Finish Math Homework from Wednesday...(Unit 2 - Lessons 10 & 11)
Math Homework: Complete Extra Practice Sheet (Unit 2 - Lessons 10 & 11)

**Math Test: Wednesday January 18**
Lesson 9 - Multiplying Whole Numbers
Lesson 10 - Dividing by a 2-Digit Number

"Math Clinic"

Now Offered 4 Times a Week!  
Don't Miss Out....

Mondays,  Wednesdays,  Thursdays and  Fridays!!!

in Room 223
during the second part of
1st Nutrition Break
(10:40-11:00AM)


Thursday January 12, 2012
Thanks to those students who attended math clinic today to review multiplication and division.  Nice to see you there!

Wednesday January 11, 2012
Math Homework: Math Makes Sense Practice Book (Unit 2 - Lessons 10 & 11)
Math Clinic: Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays AM Break

**Math Test: Wednesday January 19**
Lesson 9 - Multiplying Whole Numbers
Lesson 10 - Dividing by a 2-Digit Number

Monday January 9, 2012
Math Homework: multiplication and long division page due Wednesday
Additional Math Clinic on Tuesday January 10 during AM recess

Friday December 23, 2011
Have a very Merry Christmas!

Wednesday December 14, 2011
Unit 2 Math Test on Friday December 16
Review Lessons 1-9 (see below)
Reminder: Math Clinic on Thursday December 15 from 10:40AM-11:00AM

Friday December 9, 2011
Math Quiz on Monday December 12 on Unit 2, Lesson 5,7,8

Math Homework: Practice Page Lesson 5, 7 and 8 (see below) - Lesson 9 for Wednesday Dec. 14
Unit2Lesson5&7.pdf
Definitions:
Common Multiple - a number that is a multiple of two or more numbers.
Factor - a number that is multiplied with another number to get a product.
Product - a result of multiplication
Prime Number - a whole number with exactly two factors; itself and 1.
Composite Number - a number with three or more factors.
Prime Factor - a factor that is also a prime number.


Unit 2 Math Test on Friday December 16
Review: Unit 2 Lessons:
1 - Exploring One Million
2 - Understanding Large Numbers
3 - Comparing and Ordering Numbers
4 - Exploring Multiples
5 - Prime and Composite Numbers
7 - Using Mental Math
8 - Order of Operations
9 - Adding and Subtracting Whole Numbers

Wednesday December 7, 2011
Math Quiz on Monday December 12 on Unit 2, Lessons 5,7,8
Math Homework:
Math Makes Sense Text:
Unit 2 Lesson Nine - Adding and Subtracting Whole Numbers
p. 62 #1 & 2 (photocopy page)

Check your answers by: rounding each number up or down to the nearest 100 and completing the addition or subtraction question (e.g. if 10's and 1's column are above or below 50, such as 375=400 or 333=300).  If both solutions are similar then your initial answer is reasonable.

For example: Question: 469        Check: 500
                                    308                    400
                                    529                    500
                                  +637                   +600
                                  1943                   1900
Both solutions (1943 and 1900) are very close which suggests the initial solution is reasonable.

Monday December 5, 2011
Math Homework: MMS Practice Book Unit 2 Lesson 8 p. 24 & 25
Review Lesson 7: Mental Math

Review Lesson 7: Mental Math
1) Use compatible numbers.  
For example, 30 & 70 are compatible in 30 + 62 + 70.
2) When no regrouping is needed, start from the left.
For example, 867-324, 8-3, 6-2, 7-4, = 543 or 2 x 14 x 50 = 14 x (2 x 50).
3) Break one of the numbers apart.  
For example, 4 x 36 = 4 x (30 + 6) which would be (4 x 30) + (4 x 6) = 120 + 24 = 144.

Review Lesson 8: Order of Operations
1) Do the operations in brackets.
2) Multiply and divide, in order, from left to right.
3) Then add and subtract, in order, from left to right.
4) Remember: brackets first...then complete multiplication & division BEFORE addition & subtraction.

Friday December 2, 2011
<>Introduced Lesson 8 - Order of Operations (BE*DMAS)
<>Review Lessons 5, 7, 8
<>Review Order of Operations using BE*DMAS:
(begin with brackets, "then exponents"*, then division & multiplication, and then addition & subtraction)  *not using exponents yet
<>Review BEDMAS practice page (question 5 should show 9 x 3 x 2) and (question 20 should show 20 divided by 5) to prepare for Math Quiz on Monday December 12


Wednesday November 30, 2011
Math Homework - MMS Practice Book Unit 2 Lesson #7 p. 22 & 23 - Mental Math

Monday November 28, 2011
Math Homework - MMS Practice Book Unit 2 Lesson #5 p. 20 & 21 - Prime and Composite Numbers

Friday November 25, 2011
Math Homework: complete Factors Chart for #'s 1-20 if not yet finished
Review new definitions: factors, prime number, composite number

1) Factors: numbers that are multiplied to get a product or the result of a multiplication.
Example: 1x12=12; 2x6=12; 3x4=12;  
Therefore, the factors of 12 are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12.

2) Prime Number: is a number greater than 1 that has exactly 2 factors: 1 and itself.  
All are odd except 2.
Example: 1x2=2; 1x3=3; 1x5=5; 1x7=7; 1x11=11; 1x13=13; 1x17=17; 1x19=19; etc.
Therefore, the Prime Numbers between 1-20 include: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19.
Another way to look at it is...using cubes to build rectangles - only one rectangle can be built for these numbers.
1x2=2
1x3=3
1x5=5
1x7=7


3) Composite Number: is a number with more than two factors.
Therefore, the Composite Numbers between 1-20 include: 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20.
Another way to look at it is...using cubes to build rectangles - multiple even rectangles can be built for these numbers.
For the number:
4 - you can build 1 rectangle with 4 cubes or 2 rectangles with 2 cubes;
6 - you can build 1 rectangle with 6 cubes or 2 rectangles with 3 cubes;
8 - you can build 1 rectangle with 8 cubes or 2 rectangles with 4 cubes;
9 - you can build 1 rectangle with 9 cubes or 3 rectangles with 3 cubes;
10- you can build 1 rectangle with 10 cubes or 2 rectangles with 5 cubes;
12 - you can build 1 rectangle with 12 cubes, 2 rectangles with 6 cubes, or 3 rectangles with 4 cubes;
14 - you can build 1 rectangle with 14 cubes or 2 rectangles with 7 cubes;
15 - you can build 1 rectangle with 15 cubes or 3 rectangles with 5 cubes;
16 - you can build 1 rectangle with 16 cubes, 2 rectangles with 8 cubes, or 4 rectangles with 4 cubes;
18 - you can build 1 rectangle with 18 cubes, 2 rectangles with 9 cubes, or 3 rectangles with 6 cubes;
20 - you can build 1 rectangle with 20 cubes, 2 rectangles with 10 cubes, or 4 rectangles with 5 cubes.

Factor Chart for #s 1-20 (Prime Numbers in red and Composite Numbers in blue)

Number
Factors
1
1
2
1, 2
3
1, 3
4
1, 2, 4
5
1, 5
6
1, 2, 3, 6
7
1, 7
8
1, 2, 4, 8
9
1, 3, 9
10
1, 2, 5, 10
11
1, 11
12
1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12
13
1, 13
14
1, 2, 7, 14
15
1, 15
16
1, 3, 5, 15
17
1, 17
18
1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 18
19
1, 19
20
1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20

Monday November 21, 2011
<>no math homework (unless you need to finish up questions 1-4 in red duotang)
<>just a quick reminder to complete your learning goal page of the report card and return it to school
<>the goal page will be photocopied and then your originals will be returned to each of you in the near future
                                                                                           
                                                                        Friday November 18, 2011
Dear Students,
     It was wonderful to listen to each of you share your portfolios with your parents yesterday and today.  You have achieved so much this Fall and we are very proud of you!  Impressive!!
                                      Ms. Stewart and Mrs. O'

<>Science Flight Quiz #2 on Monday November 21

Wednesday November 16, 2011
Special Note: Thursday November 17 is a switch day - it will follow the Friday schedule
<>Math Quiz Unit 2 Lessons 1-4
<>Science Flight Quiz #2 on Monday November 21

Monday November 14, 2011
Math Clinic scheduled for Tuesday November 15 from 10:40-11:00AM
<>no math homework
<>Math Quiz Unit 2 Lessons 1-4 on Thursday November 17
<>Science Flight Quiz #2 on Monday November 21

Friday November 11, 2011
Thursday November 17 - Math Quiz
Unit 2 Lessons 1-4
Review:
<>Exploring One Million: 1 million is 1 000 thousands.
<>Understanding Large Numbers: Ways to Represent Numbers include...
 1) Standard Form: 26 489 215
 2) Words: twenty-six million four hundred eighty-nine thousand two hundred fifteen
 3) Expanded Form:
20 000 000 + 6 000 0000 + 400 000 + 80 000 + 9 000 + 200 + 10 + 5
 4) Number-Word Form: 26 million 489 thousand 215
 5) Place Value Chart:

Millions Period
Thousands Period
Units Period
Hundred Million
Ten Million
Million
Hundred Thousand
Ten Thousand
Thousand
Hundred
Ten
One
H
T
O
H
T
O
H
T
O
2
6
4
8
9
2
1
5
<>Comparing and Ordering Numbers:   <  less than    and   > greater than
<>Exploring Multiples:
   1) To find Multiples of a number: start at that number and count on by that number
  2) To find Common Multiples of two or more numbers:  find the numbers that appear in both/all list
Example:
Multiples of 5: 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60
Multiples of 3: 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 42, 45, 48, 51, 54, 57, 60
Therefore, 15, 30, 45, and 60 are common multiples of 3 and 5 that are less than 65

Monday November 21 - Science Quiz #2
Review:

Science Exploration and Field Trip Notes:
<>one atmosphere is equal to 100 km from the Earth's surface to the top of the atmosphere
<>one atmosphere is equal 7 kg of air pressure
<>Four Forces of Flight: thrust, drag, gravity, lift
<>Bernoulli's Principle:
<>air moves more quickly over a smooth, curved, and hard surface
<>fast moving air causes air pressure above a wing to decrease
<>air moves from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure
<>this upward pressure on a wing causes lift
<>examples of Bernoulli's Principle in everyday life
<>explorations completed in class that demonstrate the effects of fast moving air (blue duotangs)

Lesson Five - "How Can an Object Overcome Its Weight?"
<>explore the effects of fast-moving air - how it can produce lift, one of the forces of flight.  
<>learn about balanced and unbalanced forces.
Key Words:
balanced forces: forces that do not produce motion of an objeect when they act on that object.
curveball: a pitched ball that rotates, curves, and drops sharply as it heads toward the batter.
lift: the force that acts perpendicular to the direction of motion, causing an object to rise.
unbalanced forces: forces applied at the same time on an object that produce motion of that object.
Lesson Six - "How Can Heavy Objects Fly?"
<>investigate lift and drag.
<>explore the effects of an airfoil and its angle of attack, and relate what they learn to the design of an airplane wing.
Key Words:
airfoil: a streamlined shape with a rounded front edge and sharp trailing edge, designed to help lift or control an aircraft.
angle of attack: the angle created by the tilt of an aircraft's wing; the wing's edge forms one side of the angle, and the air stream forms the other.
drag: the force that acts on an object to resist forward motion.
leading edge: the front edge of a wing, usually rounded.
trailing edge: the back edge of a wing, usually sharply tapered.
Lesson Seven - "How Are Flying Objects Propelled?"
<>thrust is the force of flight that causes forward motion.
Key Words:
altitude: height above Earth's surface.
driveshaft: a straight rod that transmits power or motion.
jet: a stream of gas or liquid moving with strong force, often out of a small opening.
payload: the load (passengers and/or cargo) carried by a vehicle such as an airplane.
propeller: a device consisting of a revolving hub with blades that propels air or water craft.
propulsion: a force that drives something forward or onward.
rotate: turn in a circle, or revolve, around a centre or axis.
thrust: a forceful forward push.
Lesson Eight - "What Happens When an Aircraft Has No Engine?"
<>investigate the forces of weight, lift, drag, and thrust, as they affect flying objects not propelled by engines or propellers.  
<>see how the streamlined shape of an object affects its movement through the air
Key Words:
aerodynamics: the study of motion of air and the forces that act on objects moving through the air.
gliding flight/true flight: flying without power from engines or wings (gliding flight)/flying using energy or power (true flight).
streamlining: shaping an object to offer as little resistance (drag) as possible for movement through fluids.

Lesson Nine - "How Does a Pilot Control Flight?"
<>learn what control surfaces are and how, by altering these, a pilot can alter the forces of flight and control the flight of an airplane
Key Words:
ailerons: hinged sections of aircraft wings that can move up or down to roll the airplane from side to side.
centre of gravity: the point around which the mass of an object is evenly balanced.
control surfaces: moveable parts of an airplane (including ailerons, flaps, elevators, rudder) that control its movement by changing the airflow around it.
elevators: hinged sections on an aircraft's stabilizer. When the elevators go up, the stabilizer acts like an upsidedown wing, pushing the aircraft's tail down, so its nose points up.
flaps: hinged sections of wings, close to the aircraft's body.  When lowered, flaps increase lift during take-off and landing when speeds are low; they also increase drag during landing.
manoeuvrable: able to move easily in many different ways.
pitch/roll/yaw: rotations (more simply, movements) of an airplane that include up-and-down, tilting, and swiveling left and right (p34 Student Book - 9A)
rudder: the hinged section of the fin of an aircraft, which helps the aircraft turn left or right.
stable: steady; abile to return to its original position.




Wednesday November 9, 2011
What another great day!  The students' planes were unique, creative, fun, and exciting to see.  Our "6-2 Fly Off" was a hit! Mikayla, Hayden and Zack will proceed to our "Grade Six Fly Off" on Friday during Period One (between 8:40AM - 9:40AM).  

Monday November 7, 2011
What a great day at the Hamilton Warplane Museum - looking forward to seeing your planes on Wednesday!
Math Homework: Math Makes Sense Practice Book Unit 2 - Exploring Multiples: Lesson 4 page 18 & 19

Friday November 4, 2011
<>no Math homework
<>Science: complete pages 80-85 in Science Workbook (yellow duotang)
<>review Science Workbook for Monday field trip
<>Field Trip to Hamilton Warplane Museum on Monday November 7, 2011 - Bus leaving school at 7:45AM
<>bring plane to school on Wednesday November 9 for our "Class Fly-Off"
<>the top three flyer finalists from each grade six class will participate in a "Grade Six Fly Off" on Friday November 11

QUICK MATH REVIEW

Ordering Numbers:
We can use "place value" to order the following numbers:
2 385 601       3 967 424        2 481 004

Millions Period
Thousands Period
Units Period
H
T
O
H
T
O
H
T
O
3
9
6
7
4
2
4
2
4
8
1
0
0
4
2
3
8
5
6
0
1

3 967 424  has 3 millions      So, it is the greatest number.

2 481 004  has 481 thousands.   2 385 601 has 385 thousands.
So, 2 481 004 > 2 385 601

So, 3 967 424, 2 481 004, 2 385 601

Wednesday November 2, 2011
<>Math Makes Sense Practice Book: Comparing and Ordering Numbers Unit 2 - Lesson 3 (pp. 16 & 17)
<>Science workbooks (yellow duotang) Flight reading and fill-in-the-blanks pp.80-85

Tuesday November 1, 2011
<>TRIP FORMS FOR HAMILTON WARPLANE MUSEUM - DUE WED. NOV. 2/11
<>Science Workbooks (yellow duotangs) read and fill in the blanks (pages 70-75)
<>no math homework

QUICK MATH REVIEW
<>How do you make a place value chart? (It is used to represent large numbers.)
<>Review the periods (start at the right and go to the left - what comes after the millions period?)
<>How are the periods the same?  what is the common pattern within each period? Start at the right and go left.
<>Explain the several ways to represent large numbers (there are five examples below).

If we insert the following number "897 654 332" into the place value chart below it would look like this:

millions period
thousands period
units period
hundreds
tens
ones
hundreds
tens
ones
hundreds
tens
ones
8
9
7
6
5
4
3
3
2

There are several ways to represent large numbers:
a) Standard Form
b) Words
c) Expanded Form
d) Number-Word Form
e) Place Value Chart

a) Standard Form: 897 654 332
b) Words: eight hundred ninety-seven million six hundred fifty-four thousand three hundred thirty-two
c) Expanded Form: 800 000 000 + 90 000 000 + 7 000 000 + 600 000 + 50 000 + 4 000 + 300 + 30 + 2
d) Number-Word Form: 897 million 654 thousand 332
e) Place Value Chart: see above




Monday October 31, 2011
<>no homework

Friday October 28, 2011

Metric Units and Converting Between Them:

1 km = 10 hm = 100 Dm = 1 000 m = 10 000 dm = 100 000 cm = 1 000 000 mm

1) Move left from a smaller unit to a larger unit is "one tenth" the size
(divide by ten).
2) Moving right from a larger unit to a smaller unit is "ten times" the size
(multiply by 10).


King
Henry
Doesn't
Usually
Drink
Chocolate
Milk
kilo-
hecto-
deka-
unit
deci-
centi-
milli-
metre (length)
gram (mass)
liter (volume)

Wednesday October 26, 2011
Flight Project:
<>Due Date: Wed. Nov. 9 for both the plane (home project) and the flight report (in-class project).
<>The home component is intended to be a fun and creative experience - the students are asked to return their products by Nov. 9 so we can have a    "Fly Off".  

<>There are no specific instructions provided to build the plane.  Our main focus will be on the "in-class" report that we will be working on over the next couple of weeks.  This is a grade six project that will be carried out by the other grade six classes as well.  Enjoy, have fun, create!

Field Trip:
<>Forms are due: Wed. Nov. 2
<>Field Trip: Hamilton Warplane Museum on Mon. Nov. 7
(Special Note: we will be leaving the school at 7:45AM)

Math:
<>no homework
<>for Place Value Activities consider visiting:

We have begun:
Unit #2 - Whole Numbers
Lessons: Exploring One Million, Understanding Large Numbers, Comparing and Ordering Numbers, Exploring Multiples, Prime and Composite Numbers, Using Mental Math
<>read and write whole numbers in standard, expanded, and written forms.
<>use place value to represent and read whole numbers.
<>compare and order whole numbers.
<>identify and describe composite and prime numbers to 100.
<>identify and describe composite and prime numbers to 100.
<>use order of oerations.
<>esitmate sums, differences, products, and quotients.
<>use mental math to add, subtract, multiply, and divide.
<>add four 3-digit numbers and subtract from a 5-digit number.
<>multiply and divide by a 2-digit number.
<>pose and solve multistep problems.
Key Words:
million
period
billion
trillion
common multiples: a number that is a multiple of two or more numbers; 6 is a common multiple of 2 and 3;
prime number: a whole number with exactly two factors, itself and 1; for example, 7, 13, 19, 23 are prime numbers.
prime factor:
composite number: a number with three or more factors; 8 is a composite number because its factors are 1, 2, 4, and 8.
expression: a mathematical statement with numbers and operations.





Monday October 24, 2011
<>no homework

Friday October 21, 2011
<>math - Unit #1 Math Test was returned today and sent home for parents to sign and return
<>review Science notebooks (blue and yellow duotangs) for Science Quiz on Monday October 24

Wednesday October 19, 2011
<>math - no homework
<>review Science definitions, Scientific Inquiry, and lessons 1-4
<>review science notebooks (blue & yellow) for Science Quiz
<>Monday October 24 - Science Quiz on Lessons 1-4

Monday October 17, 2011
<>math - no homework
<>review Science notebooks for Science Quiz
<>Monday October 24 -
Science Quiz on Lessons 1-4:
1) Five Steps of the Scientific Inquiry Method
2) Concepts Reviewed in Lessons 1-4 ( Explorations #1-5)
(air pressure, air takes up space, air has mass, heated air rises, resistance of fluids)
<>identify three properties of air: it takes up space, exerts pressure, and has mass.  
<>understand that these properties of air affect them and everything around them.
<>identify two more properties of air: warmer air expands and rises, and cooler air contracts and falls.  
<>explore how these properties of air are applied to hot-air balloons.
<>identify air as a fluid and demonstrate the effects of resistance and compression.
<>identify common applications of air when it is compressed, or when it is used for its insulating abilities.
3) Definitions from blue duotang and yellow duotang:
Lesson 1
device: a mechanical invention used for a special purpose.
heavier-than-air device: a device that is more dense than air and therefore cannot lift off the ground or stay in the air solely as a result of buoyant force.
propel: drive forward
Lesson 2
air: the mixture of gases that surrounds the Earth.
equilibrium: a condition in which opposing forces exactly balance, or equal, each other.
force: a push or pull that makes an object move, or change speed or direction if it is already moving.  
gravity: the force that attracts things toward the centre of a large object.
mass: the amount of matter an object is made up of.
pressure: a force per unit area.
property: a quality or power that belongs specially to something.
weight: the force that gravity exerts on an object's mass.
Lesson 3
helium: a light, colourless gas that will not burn.
hot-air balloon: a large bag of lightweight material that lifts into the air when it fills with hot air; the bag and burners for heating the air are controlled from a hanging basket.
hydrogen: a light, colourless gas that burns easily.
molecule: the smallest unit that a substance can be divided into.
Lesson 4
compress: squeeze together to make smaller or more compact.
current: a flow or stream of water or air moving in one direction.
fluid: any substance that flows easily, including both liquids and gases.
perpendicular: at right angles to a given surface.
pneumatic: worked by air pressure.
resistance: an opposing force.

Friday October 14, 2011
<>review Lessons 1-4 for Unit Math Test #1 on Monday October 17
<>complete Divisibility Practice page
<>complete Master 1.21 Lesson 3&4 Extra Practice page






Wednesday October 12, 2011
<>Math Makes Sense Homework/Practice Book Lesson #4 - Solving Equations
<>Equations Page - one page
<>just a few remaining quizzes to be returned
<>Monday October 17 - Unit #1 Test
<>Review Lessons:
1 (Input/Output Machines),
2 (Number Patterns),
3 (Divisibility Rules), and
4 (Solving Equations)

Wednesday October 5, 2011
<>Step by Step Master 1.16 Unit 1 Lesson 4 - Solving Equations
<>just a few remaining quizzes to be returned
<>Monday October 17 - Unit #1 Test
<>Review Lessons:
1 (Input/Output Machines),
2 (Number Patterns),
3 (Divisibility Rules), and
4 (Solving Equations)

Tuesday October 4, 2011 (Friday schedule today)
<>finish up Unit 1 Lesson 4 Questions #1-4
<>please return Unit 1 Lesson 1&2 Quiz

Monday October 3, 2011
<>Step by Step Master 1.15 Unit 1 Lesson 3 - Divisibility
<>Unit 1 Lesson 1&2 Quiz returned to students and brought home to share with parent(s)
<>tomorrow is a switch day - Friday (Math Period 1)

Friday September 30, 2011
<>no homework
<>Our Quiz #1 on Lessons 1&2 from Unit One will be returned on Monday.
<>an additional Math Clinic will be available Monday AM Recess in Room 223

Thursday September 29, 2011
<>try out the following Number Patterns activities:




Wednesday September 28, 2011
<>no homework
<>Remember: "Math Clinic" on Thursday in Room 223 - 2nd part of 1st Break (10:40-11:00AM)

Monday September 26, 2011
<>no homework
<>finish any "unfinished" practice sheets
<>finish any "unfinished" pages in homework/practice book (e.g. Unit One Lessons 1&2)

Friday September 23, 2011.
<>Math Makes Sense Student Practice/Homework Book Unit 1 Lesson 2 Number Patterns - pages 4 & 5*
<>Practice Pages (two sheets reviewing Lesson 1 - Input/Output Machines and Lesson 2 - Number Patterns
<>On Monday we will have a "Pre-quiz assessment" - to measure the students' understanding of Input/Output Machines and Number Patterns (eg. the material presented in Unit 1 Lesson 1 & 2)
<>Wednesday we will review the concepts and practice our math study skills
<>Input/Output Machines and Number Patterns Quiz has been moved to Friday September 30
<>Thank you to the students who attended Math Clinic on Thursday Sept. 22 and/or the additional Math Clinic provided today!! :-)

*To find the pattern rule for a recursive pattern, remember the following steps:
Example: For the pattern 4, 7, 13, 25, 49...
1) First find the difference between the consecutive terms: 7-4=3, 13-7=6, 25-13=12, 49-25=24
2) Next notice the pattern in the differences: hmmmm...3x2=6, 6x2=12, 12x2=24
3) This suggests that x2 is part of the pattern rule.
4) Since the first term in the pattern is 4, try 4x2 which =8, hmmm.. but the next term after 4, is 7, then 13, 25, 49.
5) To get from 4 to 7 you will need to x2 and then -1.
6) This is the pattern rule:
   Start at 4 (which is the first term in the pattern).  Multiply by 2, then subtract 1 each time.

Wednesday September 21, 2011
<>Math Makes Sense Student Practice/Homework Book Unit 1 Lesson 3 pages 6&7
<>Remember: "Math Clinic" on Thursday in Room 223 - 2nd part of 1st Break (10:40-11:00AM)
<>Prepare for: Input/Output Machines and Number Patterns Quiz on Monday September 26

Monday September 19, 2011
<>Math Makes Sense Text Book p. 12
<>Prepare for: Input/Output Machines and Number Patterns Quiz on Monday September 26

Friday September 16, 2011
<>Step-by-Step 2 (Master 1.14) and Extra Practice 1 (Master 1.20)

Wednesday September 14, 2011
<>Math Strategies: pages 57 & 58

Tuesday September 13, 2011
"Math Clinic" will be held on Thursdays in Room 223 during the second part of 1st Nutrition Break (10:40-11:00AM)

Monday September 12, 2011
<>Math Makes Sense Practice Book page 2 and 3
<>TIP: "output" pattern rule refers to the output column only...look carefully at how the "output" numbers change. For instance,  if the numbers in the output column increase by three each time (+3, +3, +3 etc.) the pattern rule would be:

"Start at ? and add 3 each time".  The "start" number is the first number at the top of the output column.

Friday September 9, 2011
<>review multiplication strategies on page 55 and 56 in red math duotang (due on Monday September 12)

Wednesday September 7, 2011
<>review mulitiplication strategies on page 53 and 54 in red math duotang (due on Friday Sept. 9)

Tuesday September 6, 2011
<>bring in your "Get to Know Me" bag filled with 5-6 items that reflect your personality/interests, etc.
<>we will be sharing these with the class each day over the next two weeks :-)


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